One of my favorite things is homemade bread, fresh from the oven with softened butter smeared on it. These Parker House rolls are an old favorite of mine because they are filled with butter so after they bake, they fold open beautifully to spread more butter and jam on, OR to dip in soup, OR to eat with dinner.

 

I would help make these rolls in a grocery store bakery I used to work in and they always seemed to fly off the shelves. The method was slightly different, obviously since we had a larger quantity, but this is the simple at home version!

 

I know a lot of people are nervous when it comes to making yeast breads at home, but I’m telling you, “Don’t be afraid!” It’s not as complicated as you think! If you are nervous about killing the yeast with too hot of liquid, or not activating the yeast with too cold of liquid, then just get a digital thermometer! It’s the best investment to save your sanity! You only need to have the liquid reach 120 to 130 degrees Fahrenheit and you will be just fine! The warm liquid dissolves and activates the yeast to deliver amazing results!

 

If you’re still nervous, the Fleischmann’s® Yeast website – http://www.breadworld.com/education – is an amazing resource for tips and tricks to help you get started and to ensure that your baking turns out great!

 

Even I, a culinary graduate, learned something new from the Fleischmann’s Yeast website. I knew sugar helped feed the yeast and adds flavor, but I didn’t realize that sugar contributes to the rich brown color to a bread’s crust. You learn something every day!

 

You are going to love these soft, buttery rolls that split right open! Let me show you just how easy they are to make!

 

Combine 3/4 cup flour, 2 Tbsp sugar, 1 packet Fleischmann’s® RapidRise® Yeast, and 1/2 tsp salt in a large mixer bowl and stir until blended.

 

Combine 1/2 cup milk, 1/4 cup water, and 2 Tbsp butter in a microwave-safe bowl or measuring cup. Microwave on HIGH in 15 second increments until very warm, but not hot to touch (120 to 130 degrees Fahrenheit when checked with a digital thermometer). The butter won’t melt completely. Add milk mixture to flour mixture.

 

Add 1/4 cup flour; beat 2 minutes at high speed. Stir in just enough remaining flour (1 3/4 to 2 cups more) so that the dough will form into a ball.

 

Knead on a lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic and springs back when lightly pressed with two fingers, about 6 to 8 minutes. Cover with a towel; let rest for 10 minutes. (Resting allows the dough to loosen and be manageable.)

 

For the Parker House Dinner Rolls: Roll dough into a large 9×12-inch rectangle about 1/2″ thick.

 

Using a bench scrape or pizza cutter, cut 4 strips vertically about 3 inches wide. Rub softened butter on the left half of the strip.

 

Cut each strip horizontally 3 times so you have 12 squares. Fold the un-buttered half of each square overlapping the buttered side of each square and place rolls in a greased 9×13-inch or square baking dish.

 

Cover the pan with a towel and let dough rise until double in size about 30 minutes to an hour depending on how warm your kitchen is.

 

Bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 to 30 minutes or until golden brown. Brush with additional butter, if desired. Serve warm.

 

Here’s the recipe available for you to print and enjoy!

Beginner's Parker House Dinner Rolls

Yield 12 rolls

Ingredients

  • 2 to 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 1 packet Fleischmann's RapidRise Yeast
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup milk (whole, 2%, 1% OR skim)
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 Tbsp butter, PLUS 2 to 3 Tbsp more for filling and brushing on top

Instructions

  1. Combine ¾ cup flour, 2 Tbsp sugar, 1 packet Fleischmann’s RapidRise Yeast, and ½ tsp salt in a large mixer bowl and stir until blended.
  2. Combine ½ cup milk, ¼ cup water, and 2 Tbsp butter in a microwave-safe bowl or measuring cup. Microwave on HIGH in 15 second increments until very warm, but not hot to touch (120 to 130 degrees Fahrenheit when checked with a digital thermometer). The butter won’t melt completely. Add milk mixture to flour mixture.
  3. Add ¼ cup flour; beat 2 minutes at high speed. Stir in just enough remaining flour (1¾ to 2 cups more) so that the dough will form into a ball.
  4. Knead on a lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic and springs back when lightly pressed with two fingers, about 6 to 8 minutes. Cover with a towel; let rest for 10 minutes. (Resting allows the dough to loosen and be manageable.)
  5. For the Parker House Dinner Rolls: Roll dough into a large 9×12-inch rectangle about ½″ thick.
  6. Using a bench scrape or pizza cutter, cut 4 strips vertically about 3 inches wide. Rub softened butter on the left half of the strip.
  7. Cut each strip horizontally 3 times so you have 12 squares. Fold the un-buttered half of each square overlapping the buttered side of each square and place rolls in a greased 9×13-inch or square baking dish.
  8. Cover the pan with a towel and let dough rise until double in size about 30 minutes to an hour depending on how warm your kitchen is.
  9. Bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 to 30 minutes or until golden brown. Brush with additional butter, if desired. Serve warm.

Recipe Notes

Recipe is the Beginner's Dinner Rolls by Fleischmann's Yeast transformed into Parker House style rolls.

© DESSERT NOW DINNER LATER All images & content are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without prior permission. If you want to republish this recipe, please re-create the recipe, snap YOUR OWN PHOTO and re-write the recipe in YOUR OWN WORDS, or link back to this post for the recipe.
 

 

Find more delicious holiday recipes from Fleischmann’s and Food Network!

 

 

There’s a sense of pride in sharing something you’ve baked from scratch. With
Fleischmann’s Yeast, you won’t be afraid to find your creativity in the kitchen or even get your apron a little dirty. Baking with yeast this holiday season can be as easy as pre-heating the oven. To find out more, visit foodnetwork.com/holidaybaking.

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of ACH. The opinions and text are all mine.